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21…Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 4

Earl Nightingale…”You become what you think about.”

This woodworking online episode is part of the Let’s Build Series

Woodworking Tips and Techniques:

1.) Green adhesive tape is used to control the spread of the wood glue.
2.) The MDF is concealed by gluing a rabbeted top onto the veneered side walls.
3.) Paper shims are used against the adjustable stop block on the cross cut sled when trimming the box lid.
4.) The lid is placed directly onto the existing box to mark for cutting its width and length. (no measuring is needed.)
5.) The jewelry box lid is cut for length by using a cross cutting sled for the table saw.
6.) Bevels for the lid are cut with a sliding woodworking jig for the table saw.

In the woodworking shop we continue the building of the jewelry box by preparing to glue the rabbeted top onto the wood veneered side walls. To control the spread of the yellow glue we place green tape next to the area that is to be glued. Once all the adhesive tape is in place we curl the bottom of the tape so it becomes a catch for any possible dripping glue. The next step is to spread the wood glue onto the top of the walls and also onto the bottom side of the Koa rabbeted top. When we have spread the glue we place the top in its place and adjust for the 1/16″ overhang in each direction. For the purpose of clamping we set the oversized lid on top of the jewelry box and then place a few weights on this fine woodworking project.

How to make an accurate fit for the lid.

When the adhesive is set we turn our attention to fitting the lid to the rabbeted top. Here we will place the lid against the rabbets and mark for width and length using a sharp pencil. Next it is time to rip the lid on the table saw and return to the jewelry box for fitting. Since the lid is just a hair wide we take the piece to the jointer to remove a very small amount. Once the width is OK we cut for length at the table saw using the cross cut sled. When we test for length we are a bit long so we head back to the cross cut sled. In this situation we keep the stop block in place. We simply fold a piece of paper over to act as a shim and place it next to the stop block. Then we slide the lid against the shim to make our trim cut. Next, we successfully fit the lid into the rabbets where there is an even margin at all four sides.

Our lid will have beveled sides and ends so we will cut the bevels at the table saw with the aid of a shop made woodworking jig. This table saw accessory fits over the Biesemeyer fence and slides along table saw fence in a controlled manner as there is a convenient handle that forces the jig downwards and forwards. The lid is secured in the jig with a horizontal quick-release toggle clamp. Note: The table saw jig also serves as a tenoning jig.

Watch more woodworking videos!


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Segmented Woodturning…Fruit Bowl…part 2

Segmented Woodturning…Fruit Bowl

This is segmented woodturning episode – part 2.
Be sure to watch the how to woodturning video: Wood Turning…a Segmented Fruit Bowl…part 1.

Segmented woodturning - Fruit bowl This sequel continues our study to learn of one of the great woodworking crafts, segmented woodturning. In this woodworking video our focus shifts to learn how to woodturn the segmented fruit bowl. We will also be sanding and finishing the fruit bowl that contains 24 segments of which there are 12 staves of light walnut and 12 vertical spacers of dark walnut. Beautiful ribboned mahogany wood is used for the base.

 

Segmented woodturning - Fruit bowl - Taping and gluing the jointsAfter the yellow glue has set-up it is time to remove the masking tape and packing tape from the segmented bowl. (In a fine woodworking project like this it is imperative that all of the wood joints are tight and free of gaps.) It is now time to start turning wood. We begin by mounting the bowl and leveling the bottom of the wall section . Taking the diamond parting tool we will create an interior mortise that will accept the tenon of the mahogany base.

 

Segmented woodturning - Fruit bowl - Mortising the baseNext we will determine the base size.To do this we will measure the outside diameter and the mortise diameter of the bowls sidewalls. From here we will rough cut the base at the band saw allowing for a slightly larger diameter.

After the base is cut on the bandsaw we will mount the base on the wood lathe so that we can turn the tenon to fit the mortise. Again, the diamond parting tool is used to cut the tenon and a dial caliper will gauge the tenon length needed.

Segmented Woodturning - Clamping the Fruit bowlWith the base mounted on the woodturning lathe we will take the segmented assembly and fit the mortise and tenon together. When we have a good fit we will then proceed with the glue-up of the two parts of our segmented woodturning.

After the glue-up dries and the bowl structure is complete it is time for turning wood and shaping the bowl. The segmented woodturning video reveals a spindle gouge with a fingernail grind for much of the interior and exterior wood turning. Other lathe gouges used for this sequence of wood turning include the following: A roughing gouge is used to remove the waste from the base exterior. Also, you will notice round and straight scraper gouges used on occasions as well.

Segmented Woodturning - Fruit bowl on the wood latheAfter the wood turner is finished turning the fruit bowl he will then switch to sandpaper to remove any marks left by the gouge. The wood turner changes to a finer sandpaper grit as he proceeds. Typically, he will take sandpaper sheets and tear then into quarters. He will then tri-fold a quarter sheet and sand with that as the wooden bowl spins on the lathe. This fruit bowl was sanded to 220 grit sandpaper and then burnished with the wood shavings. To prepare the wood project for finishing the bowl was then wiped with a micro-fiber towel to remove any remaining dust. Our segmented woodturning is now ready for applying the protective finish.

The wood finish for the segmented fruit bowl started with an application of SealCoat and finished with three coats of satin Arm-R-Seal. This produced a nice and natural wood finish for the segmented woodturning.

Recommendations for beginning woodworkers: View the segmented woodturning video a multiple times to get a better feel for the procedures. Pay close attention to the different lathe chucks being used at various times to hold the wood. Notice the gouges being used and how they are being used. Be patient and take your time. Always practice safety around the wood lathe. Consider taking a wood turning class to become familiar with this woodcraft.

Enjoy more woodturning videos and woodturning projects!


Wood Lathe Accessories

Oneway Talon Chuck System

Oneway Live Center

Wolverine Vari-Grind Attachment

Oneway Wolverine Grinding Jig

Mini Jumbo Jaws for ONEWAY Talon Chuck

Sorby Standard Turning Tool Set, 6 Pieces

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

 

Segmented Wood Turning – Fruit Bowl…part 1

Segmented Wood Turning



Setting the blade angle on the 10 inch compound miter saw blade - Segmented Wood Turning on a wood lathe

Segmented wood turning is an interesting and unique facet of the woodworking craft as you will see in part 1 of this woodworking video tutorial. We are back in the woodworking shop creating a custom wood project. Here, we learn how to woodturn a segmented fruit bowl. The wood we are using in this segmented wood turning is light walnut for the staves, dark walnut for the vertical spacers, and ribboned mahogany for the base. The segmented wood turning technique we are using for this wood project involves the use of 12 wood staves that we will cut on the 10 inch compound miter saw and also the 12 vertical spacers we will cut with a small fine toothed dovetail saw. In this woodworking tutorial we will focus on the accurate set-up of the of the compound miter saw using a Wixey digital angle gauge and a digital protractor. Once the saw is correctly set we will cut the wood staves. From there we will concentrate on fitting and gluing all segments together by using yellow glue and masking tape.

“A rule of thumb for a warrior is that he makes his decisions so carefully that nothing that may happen as a result of them can surprise him, much less drain his power.”
Carlos Castaneda…Peruvian born American anthropologist and author. (1925-1998)

Note: To ensure precision cutting of the stave segments a 10 inch Forrest Chopmaster saw blade was used on the compound miter saw.

A Staved segment for segmented wood turning on a wood lathe

Precision cutting of the wood staves is made possible by accurately adjusting the miter saw blade with a digital angle gauge. Accuracy is a must for segmented wood turning and shop accessories such as the angle gauge and a digital protractor are essential.

This episode is part of the Let’s Build Series

Click to learn more about Segmented Woodturning

Learn more about the Wood Lathe and Segmented Wood Turning!
Wood Turning articles, Tutorials, and Segmented Wood Turning videos!



 

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

15…Let’s Build a Magazine Case

“I am an old man and have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened.”
Mark Twain…American author and humorist (1835-1910)

This episode is part of the Let’s Build Series

Many of woodworkers receive woodworking magazine subscriptions in the mail each month and as the time goes by these magazines accumulate. These magazines are a great source for reference and also inspiration so it is nice to have them protected and organized so that we can easily access the information. Now, a woodworker can simply purchase a magazine case from the publisher or from a local discount store and be done with it. However, since we are woodworkers why not select the wood of our choice and learn how to make our own wooden magazine case?

This woodworking video shows the woodworking equipment and woodworking techniques used to build a magazine case. The main power tools employed for this process are the table saw, the jointer, open drum sander, and the band saw. The dedicated dado sled for the table saw is featured in this tutorial and is used to cross cut dadoes. This table saw fixture is used for cutting rabbets, tenons, grooves, dadoes, and half-laps and makes production work easy and accurate. The cutting of rabbets are shown in this video.

Ribboned mahogany is selected as the material for the magazine case due to the woods nicely flowing grain as well as its captivating chatoyance. Mahogany machines well, is easy to sand, and it takes a nice finish. Tried and True oil varnish is used with a wipe on application and as a result the finished woodworking project has a warm hand rubbed look.

If you are a woodworking beginner pay attention to the details as shown in the band saw and table saw set-ups as they offer greater control and also greater safety.

The Band Saw Set-up
When ripping stock on the wood band saw there is a tall resaw fence clamped in place. This fence is aligned and set in accordance to the “drift” of the band saw blade. Also, notice that a featherboard keeps the bottom of the stock snug to the fence while the push stick directs the stock through the blade. This assures that the mahogany is tight to the resaw fence and also that one’s fingers and hands are clear of the band saw blade. Take you time and allow the blade to cut at its own pace.

The Table Saw Set-up
Notice the safety accessory used to control the stock as it is pushed through the table saw blade.
A small adjustable featherboard is used in the miter gauge slot in order to keep the stock tight to the table saw fence.
A shop-made featherboard is clamped to the table saw to keep wide stock tight to the fence. In this case an auxiliary board and a clamp is positioned against the featherboard to further control the situation

The Dado Sled Set-up.
The stop block clamped to the fence guarantees that stock is cut to uniform lengths. A quality dado blade set allows for fresh, clean cuts.

Keep in mind that these woodworking basics apply to beginning woodworking projects as well advanced projects.

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

11…Let’s Build a Drill Press Table

Drill Press Table for Woodworking 

This episode is part of the Let’s Build Series

The drill press is a terrific tool in the woodworking shop especially when it has a drill press table that conveniently clamps the work, provides a fence for repeatable and accurate cuts, and also offers a safer working environment. The drill press was originally set up for metal working and most tables that come with the drill press are small metal tables. As a result, they can be rather awkward for use in the woodworking shop. (The video shows how to make a drill press table specifically for woodworking.)
A better solution for the woodworker is to buy or make a woodworking drill press table. It’s a great woodworking project that will turn the drill press into one the great woodworking tools for your shop. If you buy one of these tables you are typically looking at paying at least $100. However, you can make your own drill press table and you can be working with it easily within a few hours. Also, you can customize it to your liking. Perhaps you would like to add a port for a shop vac, maybe a drawer for storing drill bits, or maybe due to shop size you will prefer a certain size table for your drill press.

Woodworking drill press tableThe material for the drill press table that is shown in the woodworking video is made from 3/4″ thick shelving with a plastic laminate surface. The material came from one of the big box hardware stores, however the 2′ x 8′ shelving was damaged on a corner and sold as 50 cent culled material.

The hardware that was added makes all the difference in the world. T Track, T bolts,  and knobs are what you see with this table.

If you have grown accustomed to working with a small metal drill press table, you will likely find drill press tables to be very handy to work with and very convenient. The addition of an adjustable fence is a huge plus and the hold down clamps work very securely. (You will find that drilling out mortises are a snap.) Moreover, the adjustable stop blocks offer repeatability as well as accuracy. When you decide to switch over to the new drill press table you will find that your work also flows much smoother. You are likely to experience much more control and also feel a greater sense of confidence when working on various woodworking projects. Let us know how your drill press table works out for you.


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

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