Google Your SEO optimized title page contents

August 18, 2017

Learn how to make Wood Inlay Bandings

Learn how to make Wood Inlay Bandings

 

Wood Inlay Bandings

Learn how to make wood inlay bandingsLearn how to make wood inlay bandings so that you can decorate your woodworking projects. There is something distinctively special about creating something in your woodworking shop with your own hands. For a lot of us, this is one of the main reasons we chose the craft of woodworking. It just feels good to use our learned skills to make something out of wood that is worthwhile. It even feels better when we can create our wood project and  then embellish it with our own shop-made decorative wood inlay bandings. So, let’s go into the details and learn how to make wood inlay bandings.

 “I can accept failure. Everyone fails at something. But, I can’t accept not trying.” …Michael Jordan

Maple, Walnut, Maple Lamination on the Tilted Bandsaw Miter SledWhen we learn how to make wood inlay bandings we find that it can be very beneficial to make wide banding logs. It really takes no more time and effort to make a wider log than a narrower banding log. As a result of creating the wider log, we will have plenty more decorative wood inlay bandings. For example, the inlay banding log shown in this posting will make about 32 lineal feet of decorative wood inlay bandings. This will work very well for a single large woodworking project or it could simply set the theme for related wood projects.

 

Walnut, Maple, Walnut Lamination at the Tilted Band Saw Miter SledTo make our wood inlay bandings on the band saw we need to start out with two lamination patterns. Notice how each lamination mirrors the other lamination. One is walnut, maple, and walnut while the sister lamination is maple, walnut, and maple. Keep in mind, it is critical that the dimensions of one pattern match the other pattern. (We use a dial caliper to ensure accuracy of the measurements.) Essentially, we are using the exact same techniques that we have used when we created “Wolf’s Tooth” wood inlay bandings.

The band saw serves as a safe, efficient, and accurate power tool for slicing our wood segments needed to create the wood inlay bandings. The table of the band saw is  set at 45 degrees  as the shopmade tilted band saw miter sled along with a stop-block is used for a controlled cut of the laminated wood segments.

Note: A general purpose 3/8″ x 4TPI bandsaw blade is being used for cutting banding segments.

Uniformly cut laminated wood segmentsNotice how the two lamination patterns match up and provide a contrast with one another in this photo. With this contrast we are creating a geometric pattern that catches the eye. As one can see, there is an alternating pattern of light and dark wood tones.

 

 

 

Seperate & organize the two lamination patterns.When all the wood segments are cut it is important to separate and organize them. This is critical as we want to make sure we have a uniform pattern free of any stray segments. Also, by laying out the wood segments ahead we have a good idea how long the outer laminations will need to be. (The tape measure in the photo reveals that the banding log will be 30″ long.)

 

 

 

Use a Combination Square to square up the first segment

Blue painter’s tape is used to help align the wood segments during the glue-up. It’s important to square up the first segment with a combination square and you’ll notice that the edges of the segments are also referenced off of the edge of the work table. We want to make sure that we have a good layout of the bottom row of segments before we start applying any glue. When we are satisfied with the layout of the bottom row we can then begin to apply our glue up while laying in the top row of segments.

Note: The bottom segments shown in this photo are the walnut, maple, walnut pattern. The top layer segment pattern is maple, walnut maple.

My preference of glue for for my wood inlay bandings is white glue. I like the fact that white glue gives me more time working time before it sets up. For me this is especially important as my workshop is in the desert where we typically have a low humidity and also can have very high temperatures. I also prefer the thinner viscosity of  white glue to that of yellow glue when working with inlay bandings. For long and wide surfaces, apply the glue from the glue bottle and then use a scrap block as a trowel to distribute the glue. However, acid brushes work very well to spread an even coat of glue onto the individual banding segments.

Gluing & applying the Outer Veneers A contrasting wood is chosen for the outer veneers.  Apply an even coating of glue to both the outer veneer and the surface of the glued up segment package.

 

 

 

 

Blue painter's tape wrapped around the banding package.Note: During this glue-up the outer veneer will have a tendency to slide out of alignment with the segment package. Make sure that both components remain in alignment to one another by wrapping blue painters tape around the total glued-up as shown in the photo.

 

 

 

The Wood Inlay Banding package clamped during glue-upApply a caul to the top of the banding package and evenly distribute firm pressure with the clamps. Then, allow adequate time for the glue to cure.

When the glue of the wood inlay banding log is cured it is then time to remove the clamps and clean up the banding log of any excess glue. Hand scrapers come in very handy for this operation. After the dried glue is completely removed, then joint one edge. Then place the jointed edge against the fence of the table saw or band saw so that the opposite edge of banding log can be ripped and made parallel.


Learn more about making wood inlay bandings.

Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band SawVideo

Let’s Install Wood Inlay BandingsVideo

Making Wood Inlay on the BandsawVideo

Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Wolf’s Tooth Banding…a Two for One

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

How to Make Spline Miter Joints

Spline Miter Joints

“Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.”
Goethe…(1749-1832) German writer, Polymath

 

The Beauty of Spline Miter Joints

 

Splined Miter Joints on a Picture Frame with Wood Inlay - Spline miter joints

Splined Miter Joints on a Picture Frame with Wood Inlay

Spline miter joints offers strength and elegance. It is a joint that wants to be seen and recognized unlike many other joints that serve a utilitarian purpose and are concealed. Often times spline miter joints are made of contrasting colored woods and that is this case of the species chosen for the joinery of this arts and crafts style picture frame selected for this posting. The frame is made from a Camala, a light toned wood from Peru and the spline miter joints for the joinery is cut from black walnut.

 

To create the spline miter joints we use a shop made spline miter jig that is simply made from scrap plywood in the woodworking shop. The jig has a 90 degree cradle that seats the picture frame and is held in place with a spring clamp. When cutting spline miter joints a flat tooth saw blade is used so that the walnut spline will fit into the saw kerf without any exposed gaps present. In this instance a 1/8″ dado blade is chosen for the task.

 

Watch how to: Make Picture Frames with the Dedicated Miter Sled for the Table Saw

 

Location of the Spline Miter Joints

 

It is a good idea to determine the location we want for our spline miter joints to be cut on the picture frame. Once this placement is made we can simply clamp a piece of scrap into the jig and to make a test cut. We will need to adjust the rip fence in or out as we will be sliding the miter jig alongside of it. Also, we need to set the saw blade height as this will represent the depth of the cut for the spline. Once these settings are adjusted it is simply a matter of carefully making a pass through the blade and then repositioning the picture frame for the next miter to be cut.

 

Learn: How to Make Perfect Miter Joints

 

Once all the cuts have been made for the spline miter joints, we can focus our attention on making the spline material. In this case it is 1/8″. Start by ripping the spline a bit wider than the depth of the miter cut and then dimension the material equal to the width of the joints’ saw kerf. Once we achieve the proper thickness for our splines it is time to cut enough triangular pieces for all joints. This is performed by using the dedicated miter sled for the band saw. It makes for quick work and it is very safe especially for working with smaller sized material.

 

Gluing the Spline Miter Joints

 

When all the splines are cut we simply brush white glue onto the spline and press the spline into the saw kerf. Now, it is just a matter of repeating this procedure for all the joints. At this point allow for the glue to set at least an hour before sanding the excess of the splines at the disc sander. (Be careful to just remove the excess of the splines and avoid sanding into the frame. Notice how the miter gauge was used to control the sanding.) When all the spline miter joints are finished with sanding at the disc sander we can then use a block sander to detail the joints in preparation for applying one of my favorite wood finishes.

 


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

 

How to Make Picture Frames with the Table Saw Miter Sled

Picture Frames Made with a Miter Sled

 

“Learning never exhausts the mind.”
Leonardo da Vinci…(1452-1519) Architect, musician, anatomist, inventor, engineer, sculptor, and painter.

Picture Frames made in the Wood Shop

Making picture frames in the woodworking shop is fun especially when we have a system in which to work. In this case we are making the picture frames from picture moulding that was made on the router table and also on the table saw using dado blades. The dado on the moulding will house the decorative wood inlay that we have previously created in the workshop. (It is nearing the Christmas Holidays at the time of this writing and we have quite a few gifts to make.)

Cutting miter joints for picture frames

Cutting miter joints for picture frames

 

Picture Frames made in Production

 The picture frames that we are making have mitered corners so we are using the dedicated miter sled for the table saw. The sled is set up to cut perfect miter joints and this will allow us to go into production mode as we are building 12 picture frames at this time. Each of the picture frames will display pictures that are 5″ x 7″. The picture moulding is of a Peruvian wood called Camala.

 

The System of making Picture Frames

1.) Using the crosscut sled…Crosscut the moulding lengths slightly oversized.

2.) Divide the lengths into two separate piles (if the sides and top/bottom of the frame are unequal.)

3.) Using the dedicated miter sled… Cut a right miter on all moulding members.

4.) Determine the actual length needed for the sides, use a stop block to control the cut length, and cut the opposite miter.

5.) Determine the actual length need for the top/bottom, use a stop block to control the cut length, and cut the opposite miter.

6.) At the workbench… Assemble the frames by fitting, gluing, and using spring clamps to secure the miter joints in place.

 

Having a dedicated miter sled enables us to create wood projects that have miters with dead-on accuracy. Using the above system with the miter sled allows for production work that is quick and efficient. Appreciate the process and enjoy the results!

 


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

21…Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 4

Earl Nightingale…”You become what you think about.”

This woodworking online episode is part of the Let’s Build Series

Woodworking Tips and Techniques:

1.) Green adhesive tape is used to control the spread of the wood glue.
2.) The MDF is concealed by gluing a rabbeted top onto the veneered side walls.
3.) Paper shims are used against the adjustable stop block on the cross cut sled when trimming the box lid.
4.) The lid is placed directly onto the existing box to mark for cutting its width and length. (no measuring is needed.)
5.) The jewelry box lid is cut for length by using a cross cutting sled for the table saw.
6.) Bevels for the lid are cut with a sliding woodworking jig for the table saw.

In the woodworking shop we continue the building of the jewelry box by preparing to glue the rabbeted top onto the wood veneered side walls. To control the spread of the yellow glue we place green tape next to the area that is to be glued. Once all the adhesive tape is in place we curl the bottom of the tape so it becomes a catch for any possible dripping glue. The next step is to spread the wood glue onto the top of the walls and also onto the bottom side of the Koa rabbeted top. When we have spread the glue we place the top in its place and adjust for the 1/16″ overhang in each direction. For the purpose of clamping we set the oversized lid on top of the jewelry box and then place a few weights on this fine woodworking project.

How to make an accurate fit for the lid.

When the adhesive is set we turn our attention to fitting the lid to the rabbeted top. Here we will place the lid against the rabbets and mark for width and length using a sharp pencil. Next it is time to rip the lid on the table saw and return to the jewelry box for fitting. Since the lid is just a hair wide we take the piece to the jointer to remove a very small amount. Once the width is OK we cut for length at the table saw using the cross cut sled. When we test for length we are a bit long so we head back to the cross cut sled. In this situation we keep the stop block in place. We simply fold a piece of paper over to act as a shim and place it next to the stop block. Then we slide the lid against the shim to make our trim cut. Next, we successfully fit the lid into the rabbets where there is an even margin at all four sides.

Our lid will have beveled sides and ends so we will cut the bevels at the table saw with the aid of a shop made woodworking jig. This table saw accessory fits over the Biesemeyer fence and slides along table saw fence in a controlled manner as there is a convenient handle that forces the jig downwards and forwards. The lid is secured in the jig with a horizontal quick-release toggle clamp. Note: The table saw jig also serves as a tenoning jig.

Watch more woodworking videos!


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

20…Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 3

”Dreams are made possible if you try.” …Terry Fox

This episode is part of the Let’s Build Series

Woodworking Tips and Techniques:

1.) Using blue adhesive tape to aid the gluing process.
2.) Using Ulmia spring clamps for assembly and fitting of miter joints.
3.) Cutting perfect miter joints on the table saw using the Dedicated Miter Sled.

In Part 3 of this how to build a jewelry box video series we are back in the woodworking shop as we continue working on the Koa wood veneer jewelry box. We have previously fit the components together during a dry run so it is now time to apply yellow glue to the miter joints. First though, we need to tape the walls of the wooden box with blue tape. This will act as a hinge as it will allow us to spread the glue into the open miters and then swing the walls to close the joints. Also, when you only have two hands the blue tape greatly simplifies the task.

Koa wood veneer packets prepared for wood glue.


When the miter joints of the box are closed we can now clamp the corner woodworking joints tight with the Ulmia clamps. These pinch clamps are worth their weight in gold as they secure the miter joint while the adhesive sets. Notice how each miter joint has a spring clamp at the top and the bottom. This give equal pressure throughout the joint and assures alignment along the length of the joint. Note: We will make sure to check our wood project for square by measuring diagonally across the jewelry box and getting equal measurements.

When the wood glue is firming up we can apply blue adhesive tape next to the rabbets since we will be gluing the rabbets to receive the base. The application of the blue tape will help to contain the yellow glue and prevent it from reaching the surface of the wood veneers. We want keep the glue in the joints only. Any excess glue that reaches the veneer surface will create unnecessary work for us and can complicate the wood finish that will later be applied.

Since we have glued the rabbets we will continue by gluing the edges of the base and fitting the base to the rabbets of our woodworking project. When the veneered base is set in place we can proceed to securely clamp the wooden box. Note: Because our base is comprised of an MDF core with both sides veneered we can glue all four edges of the base because there is virtually no wood movement unlike a solid wood base.

After the glue has dried we take the jewelry box to our woodworking bench where we set up our bench dogs to the bench top adjacent to our woodworking vise. With our Koa veneered box we prepare to clean off the glue residue with our card scraper. When we are finished scraping the glue we then sand by hand to smooth the surface.

Our attention now turns to the box lid and how it will be housed in place. We are using solid Koa wood for the lid as well using Koa to cover the tops of the veneered walls. The tops of the veneered walls will have a slight overhang and will also be mitered at the corners. These tops will include rabbets to allow the lid to seat. We create the rabbets on the table saw using dado blades along with a sacrificial dado fence. In this section of the video we pay close attention to the safety accessories employed. Notice the handled push block used when cutting the rabbets. It controls the stock being cut and also keeps our hand away from the blades. When the rip cuts are made we use a splitter and a long push stick that keeps our hands at a safe distance as well as secures that the material is flat on the table saw top as the material is fed through the saw blade.

Our next job for this woodworking project is to cut the miters on the dedicated miter sled while ensuring a proper fit to the top of the veneered box. No tape measure or rule is needed as we mark everything based on its placement to the box. This eliminates any chance of error in measurement while creating a very accurate marking. With this procedure in place we will simply mark and cut as needed and then secure the miter joints with spring clamps. When all four miters are fit we will glue and clamp them.

The box lid is dimensioned for thickness by using two power tools; a bench top planer and an open drum sander. The planer does most of the work, however for the final dimensioning and smoothing the lid is run through the open drum sander. Woodworking Tip: Because the lid is of curly koa there is a chance for grain tearout so this is one important reason why the final dimensions for the lid take place on the open drum sander.

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Related Posts with Thumbnails
'http://c.compete.com/bootstrap/'; s.src = t + __compete_code + '/bootstrap.js'; s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = 'async'; if (d) { d.appendChild(s); } }());