Google Your SEO optimized title page contents

October 23, 2017

A Sicilian Walnut Table with Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

“Beauty awakens the soul to act.”
Dante Alighieri…Italian author and poet (1265-1321)

This beautiful and elegant table was recently built in the woodworking shop of a Italian craftsman. Vincenzo, our woodworking friend lives in the beautiful Mediterranean town of Mazara del Vallo which is on the west coast of the island of Sicily. Vincenzo sent pictures of his build that is quite inspiring. His table is made of wonderfully grained walnut and has shop made decorative wood inlay bandings of maple and rosewood. The wood finish consists of six coats of shellac and buffings of wax that bring about a gloss finish.

Vincenzo contacted me towards the end of 2010 after viewing the post, Creating your own Wood Inlay Bandings…The Secrets Revealed. It was at this time that Vincenzo asked if I would consider filming a video of this wood inlay banding pattern. At my Italian friend’s request the video tutorial was filmed and the creation of this banding pattern was documented.
Recommended Video:
Wood Inlay Banding – How to Make Barber Pole Banding

The inlay banding for Vincenzo’s table was built using the band saw along with a shop built tilting band saw miter sled. This was the same technique that was used in the video. As one can see in the photos the inlay segments are all of equal length and have uniform angles that make for nice, tight joints of the banding pattern. The photos also indicate how well the width of the inlaid wood bandings fit into the routed out recesses. It is easy to see that great thought and care were used when making the wooden inlays. Along this same line, keen woodworking skills and patience were employed when the furniture inlays were applied to this exquisite piece of furniture.

Recommended Video:
Tilting Bandsaw Miter Sled

A few things to note:
1.) Check out the classically detailed edging of the cove and bead moulding combination around the tabletop.
2.) Take a look at the table legs which are simply elegant. The legs are tapered, squared to accept the rails, and have a distinctive dado which defines the separation from the square to the taper. There is even a bead element included at the dado relief. This is a very well thought out design!
3.) A front drawer is also included. Notice how the ornamental wood inlay banding design is laid out on the drawer’s face. There is a nice even margin of walnut along the edge of the drawer that is equal to the banding’s width.
4.) The front drawer is constructed with dovetail joinery.

Vincenzo…Thank you for sharing your finished product with all of us as it is very inspiring. Your wonderful wood inlay bandings provide a lovely accent for a finely crafted table that will surely be an heirloom. Great job!

Check out these Wood Inlay Banding Designs:
Buffard Freres…The 1926 Wood Inlay Banding Catalog



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band Saw

Wood Inlay Strips Cut on the Band Saw

 

“Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.”
Albert Schweitzer… (1875-1965) Humanitarian, Theologian, Missionary, Medical Doctor

The Importance of  Thin, Uniform Wood Inlay Strips

 

It’s important to be able to cut thin wood inlay strips. One of the challenges in making bandings of wood inlay is maximizing the material. We certainly do not want to cut the wood inlay banding too thick or too thin as either would be wasteful of our decorative inlay that we took the time to make. We also want to be able to cut the wood inlay to a uniform thickness. Cutting wood inlay bandings to an equal thickness is a sign that we are on the right track to maximizing our material. So, just how do we get the right thickness of uniform thin wood inlay strips?

Wood Inlay Bandings in Picture Frames

Wood Inlay Bandings in Picture Frames

Why Cut Thin Wood Inlay Strips on the Band Saw?

The woodworking video shows how ripping thin strips of wood inlay can be done on the band saw. The band saw is chosen because the woodworker in the video found it safer cutting on the band saw than the table saw. Also, the saw kerf of the band saw blade is narrower than that of a table saw blade. So, by cutting the wood inlay on the band saw there is a higher yield of bandings.

 

In the wood inlay video the woodworker has set up a thin rip jig with a ball bearing along with a shop made band saw rip fence. This band saw rip fence allows for the bearings and guide assembly of the band saw to be set to a height just above the material to be cut. Also, you will notice that this rip fence allows more room for the left hand of the woodworker than the manufacturer’s rip fence allows. These are two critical safety reasons in and of themselves.

 

The setup of the fence and rip jig controls the movement of the material being pushed through the band saw blade. The only movement is forward as there is no lateral movement of the material.

 

The following two things need to be achieved in order to maintain uniform thickness of the wood inlay bandings:
1.) The fence needs to be set parallel to the “drift” of the band saw blade.
2.) The material being ripped needs to be properly dimensioned, paralleled, and squared.

 

Recommendation…Take a piece of scrap material and test cut the piece and then check with a digital or dial caliper for uniform thickness. Make adjustments as necessary to properly set the fence to the “drift.”

Dial caliper measures wood inlay banding

Dial caliper measures wood inlay banding

A Technique for Ripping Wood Inlay Banding

Once the fence is correctly set for the “drift” we can adjust for thickness of cut. This is just a matter of setting the bearing of the thin rip jig to a distance out from the band saw blade. This should be equal to our desired thickness of the wood inlay bandings. Take a piece of scrap material to test the cut for the desired thickness and adjust the thin rip jig as necessary. When we have the correct thickness then we will slide the bearing about an inch or so before the band saw blade. Now, lock the rip jig securely in place.

 

Now that we have accounted for the drift and have the thickness that we want it is time to set our material against the bearing. Now place the band saw rip fence alongside the wood inlay to be cut. Lock the fence, turn on the power, and take the first cut. After each cut simply repeat the process. If this process is followed the material cut will be of uniform thickness and we will have maximized our material. The woodworking video simply reveals this process of ripping uniform thin strips of wood inlay banding.

 

Related Videos and articles:
…..Creating Picture Frame Moulding
…..How to Make Picture Frames with Wood Inlay

 



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Wolf’s Tooth Wood Inlay Banding…a Two for One

“It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.”
…..Muhammad Ali, Heavyweight boxing champ…1942 –

Wolf's Tooth Banding... a closer look

Detailed view of Wolf's Tooth banding

One of the benefits of creating “Wolf’s Tooth” wood inlay bandings is that you actually get two bandings for the effort of one. What do I mean by this? When the initial cuts from the laminated stock are made on the table saw using the dedicated miter saw we flip the stock after each segment is cut. By doing this we are getting the necessary angles for the segments however, we wind up with segments that have two different color combinations. After all of the segments are cut we then need to carefully separate the segments by color. This way we will have two distinctive color patterns for our hardwood inlays. (The separating of the two color type can be tedious however, it is very important in order to maintain uniformity of the custom inlay bandings.)

Wolf's Tooth Wood Inlay banding segments

Wolf's Tooth Wood Inlay banding segments

In the photo to the right notice how the wooden inlay segments are cut from the same laminated stock. The stock is repeatedly flipped along the miter sled fence with each cut producing segments of two color types.
(The segment shown on the left goes with the inlay pattern on the left side picture frame while the segment on the right corresponds to the inlay design of the picture frame on the right.)

Notice the importance of of the wood color. (Place dark woods next to light color woods to get the best contrast.)
………………………………….
Also read…Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Learn more about wood inlay by studying “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 1” and “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2.”
……………………………………………….
Watch the following wood inlay videos:

Creating bandings for wood inlay

Wood Inlay…the Bandings are ready

How to install Wood Inlay



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.
…..Aristotle, Greek Philosopher (384 BC – 322 BC)

Inlay Wood...Wolf's Tooth...Custom Inlay Banding

Wooden Inlay...Wolf's Tooth...Custom Inlay Banding

The “Wolf’s Tooth” decorative wood inlay banding pattern is a wonderful custom inlay used to embellish furniture, picture frames, wooden boxes, and a host of other woodworking projects. The wooden segments (teeth) were cut on the table saw equipped with a Forrest Woodworker II 40 tooth saw blade. Also, the dedicated miter sled was used in order to maintain precision and to create uniform triangular segments which make up the “teeth” of this hardwood inlay banding. White glue is used instead of yellow glue to allow a greater working time when assembling the segments into position within the banding “sandwich.” Veneer inlays called “bandings” will be sliced on the band saw at about 3/32″. The bandings will eventually be fit and let into a plough or dado of the wood project to be decorated.

Wolf's Tooth...Wood Inlay Bandings

A mahogany picture frame with decorative wood inlay banding of cherry, walnut, and maple.

The African mahogany picture frame reveals how a custom wood inlay banding like the “wolf’s tooth’ pattern can enhance a woodworking project. This hardwood inlay banding consist of maple, cherry, and walnut. Notice how the colors of the various hardwoods contrast one another within the repetitive pattern of the “teeth” and also how the borders play off of the mahogany picture frame. The wood inlay banding naturally draws attention to the picture frame and further draws awareness to celebrate the photograph.

A banding with the same “wolf’s tooth” pattern is shown below the picture frame. This particular veneer inlay includes maple, cherry, and walnut within the “teeth” pattern however, the outer border consist of walnut and holly. The pure white holly will create an even greater contrast than a maple border when inlaid into a wood with a dark tone.

(By the way…The photograph is of my Great, Grandfather along with his two prized working mules. The photo was taken on his farm outside of Salem, Missouri where he and his family were a few of the early settlers in this area during the 1850’s.)

Learn more about wood inlay by studying “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 1” and “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2.”

Watch the following wood inlay videos:

Creating bandings for wood inlay

Wood Inlay…the Bandings are ready

How to install Wood Inlay


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Hardwood Inlays made in the Woodworking Shop

“Whether you think that you can, or that you can’t, you are usually right.”
…Henry Ford (1863-1947)

Segments of a custom inlay.

As we near the holidays it’s time to start planning ahead for gifts that will be made in the woodworking shop. In the picture you can see many wood segments that have been cut on the dedicated miter sled for the table saw. It’s quite important that the angles of the segments are consistent so that they line up tightly within the decorative wood pattern. However, this job is quite easy to accomplish with the miter sled and a stop block. This particular pattern is referred to as “Wolf’s Tooth” according to page 136 of Pierre Ramond’s tremendous book, Marquetry. These segments will be glued together and sandwiched between two laminated strips of of holly and walnut. This “wood sandwich” will wind up being sliced on the band saw and the strips will become known as wood inlay bandings. (The custom wood inlay banding to be created will be part of a DIY wood project, the making of picture frames.)

A Stop Block on the Miter Sled

In the photo to the right the stop block controls the length of the custom inlay segment and the 45 degrees angle is created by simply keeping the laminated wood strip flat against the miter fence. When an angle is cut the strip of laminated wood is then flipped over to make make another angled cut. This forms another segment. From this point it is simply repetition as many segments are needed to create the wood inlay bandings.

Once the wooden inlays are created the woodworker is free to inlay furniture, embellish picture frames, or perhaps inlay boxes. It’s just a matter of letting one’s imagination express itself to create a one of a kind piece.

Learn more about wood inlay by studying “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 1” and “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2.”

Watch the following wood inlay videos:

Creating bandings for wood inlay

Wood Inlay…the Bandings are ready

How to install Wood Inlay


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Related Posts with Thumbnails
'http://c.compete.com/bootstrap/'; s.src = t + __compete_code + '/bootstrap.js'; s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = 'async'; if (d) { d.appendChild(s); } }());