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February 23, 2017

Card Scraper for Wood Inlay Bandings

Card Scraper for a Smooth Surface

 

Card Scraper: An Inexpensive  Tool of Great Value

 

A card scraper is an inexpensive tool of flat steel. It is about the size of a index card and is used by the woodworker in the woodworking shop. The edges of this tool are polished and then a burnisher is used at an angle to produce a burr. This burr actually forms a hook. To use the card scraper hold each end with your fingers while pressing forward with both thumbs. This will cause the card scraper to flex. Tilt the scraper forward slightly to begin scraping with the flexed portion of the scraper. One beauty of the card scraper is that the woodworker can utilize the full length of the hooked edge. When that edge dulls, simply flip the card over and use another sharp edge. Each of the two length will have two hooked edges.

The Card Scraper is Often Overlooked

 

Cosmati Picture Frames - Before Card Scraper UsageThis great hand tool is often overlooked and yet it can help one to produce excellent results for one’s woodworking projects. It takes just a little time to understand how the card scraper is sharpened. However, once you learn how to sharpen one you will be well on your way. (The photo at left was taken prior to using a card scraper.)

 

 

Prepare for the Finish 

 

The card scraper can greatly assist the woodworker when preparing the woodworking project for finish. The card scraper will save one from a lot of heavy sanding to remove milling marks, excess glue squeeze out, and rasp marks. Many woodworkers will generally take a power sander with a heavy grit to remove these marks and then progress to finer grit sandpaper. However, a woodworker can eliminate a lot of the heavy sanding by using the card scraper.

 

A Card Scraper Offers Control

 

 Cosmati Picture Frames - After Card Scraper UsageIn the case of working with 3/32″ wood inlay bandings, a card scraper offers the woodworker a great deal of control. The scraper works well with wood segments of varying grain directions where tear out is a major concern. Some may be tempted to use hand planes, a planer, or power sander to level the wood surface. However, there is always the chance of bringing the surface too low thus ruining the wood inlay banding.  Try using a card scraper and then a finer grit sandpaper to prepare for your choice of wood finish. (The photo at the left was taken after using a card scraper.)

 

Watch more YouTube woodworking how to videos online.

…Your comments are welcomed…

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University


Online how to Woodworking Guide – The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

An Online How to Woodworking Guide

Segmented Woodturning - Woodturner - Online how to woodworking Guide- The Apprenticeand The Journeyman UniversityThe Apprentice and The Journeyman University is an Online How To Woodworking Guide  specifically for woodworkers. This ongoing collection of  woodworking videos, articles, and wood projects is for the beginning woodworker as well as the experienced woodworker. The primary goal of sharing this woodworking knowledge base is to pass on experience to those who want to take their woodworking skills to a higher level.

The online how to woodworking guide is set up so that you can easily browse through the various woodworking subjects at a glance.  This offers woodworkers an opportunity learn many new woodworking ideas. These are how to woodworking tips that you can immediately apply in your woodworking shop. So, if you are new to woodworking and have been wanting to learn how to woodwork, take your time and enjoy this knowledge base. If you are an experienced craftsman, here’s an opportunity to share proven woodworking ideas and techniques. If you find value with this online how to woodworking guide, consider The Apprentice and The Journeyman University as a regular source for your online woodworking.

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”
Leonardo da Vinci 
…Italian painter, sculptor, architect, and engineer…(1452-1519)

Architectural Details…Interior, Frank Lloyd Wright Robie House, Chicago - Frank Lloyd Wright Homes - Online how to Woodworking Guide

Custom Inlay Designs for Arts and Crafts Woodworking

Decorative Door Knockers of Florence, Italy

Decorative Inlay Patterns for Custom Hardwood Inlays

Decorative Woodworking Patterns of Architectural Millwork & Custom Moulding

Fine Woodworking Patterns for the Skilled Woodworker

Frank Lloyd Wright Homes – CarpentryVideo

Front Doors of Florence Italy

Santa Maria del Fiore…Duomo Cathedral of Florence, Italy

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Miraculous Staircase – Carpentry and WoodworkingVideo

Steve’s Woodworking Shop Tour

The Practice of Woodworking

Wood Veneer Coffee Table by Vincenzo

Woodworking Skills…The Shape of Things to Come

Arts and Crafts…

Gustav Stickley…Father of the American Arts and Crafts MovementVideo

Custom Picture Frame with Hardwood Inlay

Crosscut Sleds…Band Saw Cross Cut Sleds - Bandsaw Crosscut sled - new to woodworking

A French Built Dedicated Miter Sled

Bandsaw Crosscut SledVideo

Building a Dedicated Miter Sled for the tablesawVideo

Dedicated Miter Sled…revisited

Let’s Build a Bandsaw Miter SledVideo

Let’s Build a Dedicated Dado Sled for the Table SawVideo

Let’s Make Picture Frames with the Dedicated Miter SledVideo

SketchUp of the Dedicated Miter Sled for the Tablesaw

Tilting Bandsaw Miter SledVideo

Inspiration…

James Krenov…Legendary Woodworker 1920-2009

Inspiration in Venice, Italy

 Remembering James KrenovVideo

Sam Maloof…woodworking interview…1982Video

Joinery…

Box Joint Fence for the Dado Crosscut SledSplined Mitre Joints - Picture Frame - Joiner - Joinery

Cutting Tenons on a Dado Crosscut SledVideo

How to Make Perfect Miter Joints

Let’s Make Spline Miter JointsVideo

Mastering the Miter JointVideo

The Splined Miter JointVideo

 

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A Custom Bathroom Wall Cabinet with Raised Panel Doors

A Hand Dovetailed Black Walnut Jewelry Box

A Multidrawer Wall Cabinet for the Workshop

A Woodworking Drill Press Table

Double Bevel Marquetry…a Tulip of Various Woods

How to Make a Picture Frame – Top Woodworking TipsVideo 

Let’s Build a Drill Press TableVideo

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 1Video

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 2…Vacuum PressVideo

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 3Video

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 4Video

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 5…WoodturningVideo

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 6…JoineryVideo

Let’s Build a Magazine CaseVideo

Koa Wood for a Woodworking Project

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Bandsaw Resawing Method…Article & Video

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Cutting Thin Strips on the Band SawVideo

Finish Work Methods for an Inlaid Picture FrameArticle & Video

How to adjust for Band Saw Blade DriftVideo

How to Create Dentil MouldingVideo

How to Cut Uniform Thin Strips

Woodworking Tip – The Power of the ShimVideo

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Card Scraper for Wood Inlay Bandings

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Poorboy Parallel Clamps…questions from a Woodworker

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A Study of Creating Wood Inlay Bandings

Buffard Freres…The 1926 Wood Inlay Banding Catalog

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How to install Wood InlayVideo

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How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2

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How to Make Picture Frames with Wood Inlay

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Let’s Install Wood Inlay BandingsVideo

Making Wood Inlay on the BandsawVideo

Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band SawVideo

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A fascinating woodturning process

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 Wood turning tools used for the Salt and Pepper Mills

 

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 A Salad Bowl set of maple & walnut…part 1

A Salad Bowl set of maple & walnut…part 2

Finishing the Segmented Vase of walnut & mapleVideo

Gluing and Aligning wood rings for Segmented Turnings

Mortising the base of the segmented vaseVideo

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Organizing the segments and rings

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Turning a Segmented Vase on a Wood Lathe

Woodturning…A Segmented Vase of Walnut and Maple

Woodturning…Dinner Salad Bowls of Mahogany and Walnut

Woodturning… video of the 9″ x 12″ Segmented VaseVideo

Wood Turn a Segmented Knob on a Wood Lathe…Video

Wood Turning…a Segmented Fruit Bowl…part 1Video

 Wood Turning…a Segmented Fruit Bowl…part 2Video

……

Woodworking Power Tools


Sliding Bevel Gauge – Woodworking Layout Tool

Sliding Bevel Gauge

 

What is it?

Sliding bevel gauge: – The bevel gauge is an essential tool used by carpenters and woodworkers. It is used in layout work for checking and transferring angles. This vital tool belongs in every woodworkers tool box along with other layout tools such as the combination square, framing square, and marking gauge. When a woodworker is dealing with a compound angle, it is often a good idea to have two sliding bevel gauges. This way each bevel square can securely maintain each needed angle.

Sliding bevel gauge - Woodworking layout tool for marking and measuring angles

Sliding bevel gauge – note the locking devices.

The sliding bevel gauge is composed of three parts; the stock, the blade, and the locking device. The stock is typically made from metal or a hardwood such as rosewood. The blade is often made from a hardened and tempered steel. Finally, the locking device secures the blade angle to the stock. The locking devices of the sliding bevel gauge can vary. Some locking devices (wing nut tighteners or thumb screws) are located at the end of the stock while some locking devices (small metal levers) are positioned at the pivot point of the tool. The blades of sliding bevel gauges typically range from 4″ – 12″.

Sliding bevel gauge - Woodworking layout tool for marking and measuring angles

Setting the angle of the Table Saw Blade

Pros and Cons of the Locking Devices

A sliding bevel gauge that has the thumb and finger lever at the pivot point has a unique disadvantage to a bevel gauge with either a wing nut tightener or thumb screw at the end of the stock. What is the disadvantage of having the locking device on the side? Sometimes the locking device on the side can stick out and interfere with the operation.  The sliding bevel gauge with a thumb screw at the bottom of the stock does not have this issue. This why I recommend that you select a sliding bevel gauge with a thumb screw at the bottom of the stock. You’ll be better off in the long run.

Sliding bevel gauge - Woodworking layout tool for marking and measuring

Note: this layout tool is sometimes referred to as; sliding T bevel, bevel gauge, or a carpenter’s bevel.

Common uses for the sliding bevel square are numerous. The following are just a few examples:

1.) Laying out the angles on rafters to be cut when building a roof.

2.) Determining the inside angle of an existing corner where two walls intersect.

3.) Setting up angles to be cut on machines such the table saw, band saw, or miter saw.

4.) The sliding bevel gauge is commonly used to lay out dovetails.

5.) The sliding bevel gauge can be used when bisecting an angle.

6.) Transferring angles.

Sliding bevel gauge - Woodworking layout tool for marking and measuring

Bisecting an angle

Poorboy Parallel Clamps…questions from a Woodworker

Woodworker Parallel clamps made in the Wood Shop

Woodworking Parallel clamps made in the Wood Shop

Perhaps you watched the recent woodworking video How to make poorboy Parallel Clamps.

Here are a few questions from one viewer that got me thinking.
A quick question …The poorboy parallel clamps obviously works well for panel glue ups, but what are limitations you could see. For instance:

* Could you use this with deeper pads for a benchtop glue up? or would the clamping force not be up to that task?
* Would longer pads apply more pressure across whole glue up or would more clamps be better?

………………………

These are very interesting questions.
1.) Benchtop glue-up. While I have not experienced a benchtop glue-up using the poorboy adjustable parallel clamps, I sense that it could be done if the wood clamps were proportionate to the pieces being clamped. I believe the system itself would work and that the clamping force would be adequate for a good glue-up. (However, for larger glue-ups I may consider using steel screws or perhaps lag screws instead of drywall screws where the pillow blocks attach to the main beam.)

Deeper pads? I believe the pads could be a bit deeper. However, consider putting the poorboy clamps on both the top and the bottom of the glue-up. This could give good even pressure all the way around and on the top and bottom of the pieces being glued. Remember, these woodworking clamps are cost effective so it doesn’t hurt for woodworkers to add more clamps.

2.) Longer pads or more clamps?…My instincts tell me more clamps. Here are my thoughts why. A clamp has so much pressure when fully tightened. A longer pad will not increase this pressure, but it will dispurse it in a wider area. More clamps mean more of pressure that can be equally distributed. (disclaimer…woodworker here, not a rocket scientist) ;)

Limitations? Keep an open imagination as there are many beneficial uses for the poorboy clamp.

Woodworking parallel clamp made by a woodworker

Poorboy parallel clamp tightened for a glue-up

A few thoughts…

Miguel, a viewer to the blog mentioned that he now has 3 pairs of the poorboy clamps. He brought up a good point when he explained that he likes the clamps because they are light in weight. This makes the clamps easier to handle than a heavier parallel or pipe clamp. If you were clamping all day long which type clamp would you prefer?

A woodworker may consider having pairs of these parallel clamps that vary in length. However, a longer length clamp can simply be shortened by moving the second pillow block or adding a third pillow block to create the length needed at the time.

Certainly, there are instance where it is advantageous the use store bought parallel clamps or pipe clamps before using the poorboy parallel clamps. However, there are numerous occasions where the poorboy parallel clamps would be my first choice. Why?
Because…
On the job site and in the workshop.
1.) On the job site, rarely does a finish carpenter have access to all the parallel clamps needed for the job at hand. However, a carpenter does have access to wood and screws necessary to build the poorboy clamps. There is very little cost in materials and in labor to make the size of clamps needed for the wood project.

2.) The poorboy clamps are very light in weight and easy to position. At this point it is simply a matter of tapping the pillow block to secure the fit.

3.) The poorboy clamps can be made to virtually any length that is required. Store bought parallel clamps are limited by their length. Pipe clamps and bar clamps can be long, but they can also heavy to handle and can also mar the surface of the material being glued.

Let me know how the poorboy parallel clamps work for you.

Recommended Videos:

Let’s Build a Drill Press Table
Let’s Build a Dedicated Dado Sled for the Table Saw
Let’s Build a Drill Press Table

The Apprentice and The Journeyman now has woodworking Plans and Books available for purchase.

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Review…Ulmia Miter Clamps and Pinch Clamps

Ulmia miter clamps and pinch clamps for miter joints - Ulmia miter clamps for woodworking projects

Ulmia miter clamps and pinch clamps for miter joints

Ulmia Miter Clamps and Pinch Clamps

Ulmia miter clamps are simply amazing woodworking tools. A number of woodworkers have inquired about the Ulmia miter clamps used in the articles and videos of this blog. So, here is my response and a woodworking tool review of the Ulmia Miter Clamp set and Ulmia Pinch Clamps. These are terrific tools for clamping corners. Read on and you will understand why.

Over 30 years ago I took a deep breath as I purchased what I thought at the time were expensive woodworking tools for joining miter joints. The Ulmia miter clamps consist of a set of specialized pliers and clamp rings. There are also the smaller spring pinch clamps for securing an dead-on fit for the smaller miters. These clamping devices had a prominent place in my tool box 30 years ago and they still do today. Back then for a young carpenter serving my apprenticeship they seemed pretty pricey. However, the purchase was made as an investment and over time the investment has paid off handsomely. It’s hard to count the number of times that the Ulmia spring clamps and spring pinch clamps have been used on various wood projects. Simply put, these clamps have made the quality of my finish carpentry and woodworking in the shop much better. Here’s why.

Ulmia Pliers, ring clamps, and picture frame miter joints - Ulmia Miter Clamps and Pinch Clamps.

Ulmia Pliers, ring clamps, and picture frame miter joints.

As finish carpenters and woodworkers we often work with miter joints. We may cut miters for all types of moulding…crown, base, chair rail, you name it. Anytime we fit and glue miters we need to secure the joint until the glue sets. The same applies to many other miter situations with wood projects in the shop and the Ulmia miter clamps do a superb job. These tools are a cinch to work with as they allow the woodworker to simply go from miter to miter with ease. The Ulmia pliers and ring clamps work well on larger miter joints when more pressure is needed to secure the joint. The Ulmia spring pinch clamps perform well for the smaller miter joints requiring less pressure. I recommend these tools in a heartbeat and chances are you’ll be glad to have them when gluing miter joints in your woodworking shop. The Ulmia miter clamps allow the woodworker to work more accurately while working faster. The Ulmia miter clamps and spring pinch clamps definitely allow the finish carpenter and woodworker to work with a greater sense of self confidence. Simply align the miter joint and fasten the miter clamp. Keep in mind, these priceless tool will last you a lifetime.

Here are examples of why I enjoy working with the Ulmia miter clamps and spring pinch clamps.

Ulmia Spring Pinch clamp secures a glued miter joint - Ulmia Miter Clamps and Pinch Clamps

An Ulmia Pinch clamp secures a glued miter joint.

Related Videos and Articles:

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 3

Let’s Make Picture Frames with the Dedicated Miter Sled

Mastering the Miter Joint

How to Make Perfect Miter Joints


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

 

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