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February 23, 2017

Online how to Woodworking Guide – The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

An Online How to Woodworking Guide

Segmented Woodturning - Woodturner - Online how to woodworking Guide- The Apprenticeand The Journeyman UniversityThe Apprentice and The Journeyman University is an Online How To Woodworking Guide  specifically for woodworkers. This ongoing collection of  woodworking videos, articles, and wood projects is for the beginning woodworker as well as the experienced woodworker. The primary goal of sharing this woodworking knowledge base is to pass on experience to those who want to take their woodworking skills to a higher level.

The online how to woodworking guide is set up so that you can easily browse through the various woodworking subjects at a glance.  This offers woodworkers an opportunity learn many new woodworking ideas. These are how to woodworking tips that you can immediately apply in your woodworking shop. So, if you are new to woodworking and have been wanting to learn how to woodwork, take your time and enjoy this knowledge base. If you are an experienced craftsman, here’s an opportunity to share proven woodworking ideas and techniques. If you find value with this online how to woodworking guide, consider The Apprentice and The Journeyman University as a regular source for your online woodworking.

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”
Leonardo da Vinci 
…Italian painter, sculptor, architect, and engineer…(1452-1519)

Architectural Details…Interior, Frank Lloyd Wright Robie House, Chicago - Frank Lloyd Wright Homes - Online how to Woodworking Guide

Custom Inlay Designs for Arts and Crafts Woodworking

Decorative Door Knockers of Florence, Italy

Decorative Inlay Patterns for Custom Hardwood Inlays

Decorative Woodworking Patterns of Architectural Millwork & Custom Moulding

Fine Woodworking Patterns for the Skilled Woodworker

Frank Lloyd Wright Homes – CarpentryVideo

Front Doors of Florence Italy

Santa Maria del Fiore…Duomo Cathedral of Florence, Italy

Woodworking Ideas & Patterns from Santa Maria del Fiore Duomo

Articles…Segmented woodturning - Wood lathe - new to woodworking - woodworking ideas

Band Saw Woodworking Safety Tips

How Venice Italy was Built on a Foundation of Wood

Miraculous Staircase – Carpentry and WoodworkingVideo

Steve’s Woodworking Shop Tour

The Practice of Woodworking

Wood Veneer Coffee Table by Vincenzo

Woodworking Skills…The Shape of Things to Come

Arts and Crafts…

Gustav Stickley…Father of the American Arts and Crafts MovementVideo

Custom Picture Frame with Hardwood Inlay

Crosscut Sleds…Band Saw Cross Cut Sleds - Bandsaw Crosscut sled - new to woodworking

A French Built Dedicated Miter Sled

Bandsaw Crosscut SledVideo

Building a Dedicated Miter Sled for the tablesawVideo

Dedicated Miter Sled…revisited

Let’s Build a Bandsaw Miter SledVideo

Let’s Build a Dedicated Dado Sled for the Table SawVideo

Let’s Make Picture Frames with the Dedicated Miter SledVideo

SketchUp of the Dedicated Miter Sled for the Tablesaw

Tilting Bandsaw Miter SledVideo

Inspiration…

James Krenov…Legendary Woodworker 1920-2009

Inspiration in Venice, Italy

 Remembering James KrenovVideo

Sam Maloof…woodworking interview…1982Video

Joinery…

Box Joint Fence for the Dado Crosscut SledSplined Mitre Joints - Picture Frame - Joiner - Joinery

Cutting Tenons on a Dado Crosscut SledVideo

How to Make Perfect Miter Joints

Let’s Make Spline Miter JointsVideo

Mastering the Miter JointVideo

The Splined Miter JointVideo

 

 ProjectsKoa Jewelry Box - Veneer - Veneering - wood veneer - wooden jewelry boxes

A Custom Bathroom Wall Cabinet with Raised Panel Doors

A Hand Dovetailed Black Walnut Jewelry Box

A Multidrawer Wall Cabinet for the Workshop

A Woodworking Drill Press Table

Double Bevel Marquetry…a Tulip of Various Woods

How to Make a Picture Frame – Top Woodworking TipsVideo 

Let’s Build a Drill Press TableVideo

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 1Video

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 2…Vacuum PressVideo

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 3Video

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 4Video

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 5…WoodturningVideo

Let’s Build a Jewelry Box…Part 6…JoineryVideo

Let’s Build a Magazine CaseVideo

Koa Wood for a Woodworking Project

Techniques…Cutting thin strips - Saw Techniques - Bandsaw Jig - Resaw Band saw

Band Saw Rip Fence made in the ShopVideo

Bandsaw Resawing Method…Article & Video

Creating Picture Frame MouldingVideo

Cutting Thin Strips on the Band SawVideo

Finish Work Methods for an Inlaid Picture FrameArticle & Video

How to adjust for Band Saw Blade DriftVideo

How to Create Dentil MouldingVideo

How to Cut Uniform Thin Strips

Woodworking Tip – The Power of the ShimVideo

Tools…Wooden picture frame - Ulmia Miter Clamps - Miter clamp - Mitre Clamps - Pinch Clamp

A Favorite Tool…The Wixey Digital Angle Gauge

Card Scraper for Wood Inlay Bandings

How to make Poorboy Parallel ClampsVideo

Poorboy Parallel Clamps…questions from a Woodworker

Precision Woodworking Tools…using a Caliper

Sliding Bevel Gauge – Woodworking Layout Tool

The 5 Most Important Power Tools in my Woodworking Shop

Try Anti-Fatigue Mats…your feet will thank you!

Ulmia Miter Clamps and Pinch Clamps

Using Push Sticks for Safe WoodworkingArticle & Video

Zero Clearance Table Saw Inserts

Wood Inlay…Wood Inlay Bandings - How to make Wood Inlays - Making Inlay Banding - Decorative Wood Inlay

A Sicilian Walnut Table with Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

A Step by Step Process…A Banding with Checkers

A Study of Creating Wood Inlay Bandings

Buffard Freres…The 1926 Wood Inlay Banding Catalog

 Buffard Freres wood inlay bandings…1134-1141

Checkered Wood Inlay Bandings

Creating bandings for wood inlayVideo

Creating your own Wood Inlay Bandings…The Secrets Revealed

Hardwood Inlays made in the Woodworking Shop

How to create Barber Pole Wood Inlay Banding

How to Glue Wood Inlay BandingArticle & Video

How to install Wood InlayVideo

How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 1

How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2

How to Make Designs in Wood InlayArticle & Video

How to Make Picture Frames with Wood Inlay

Learn How to Make Wood Inlay BandingsVideo

Let’s Install Wood Inlay BandingsVideo

Making Wood Inlay on the BandsawVideo

Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band SawVideo

The Art of Wood Inlay BandingArticle

Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Wolf’s Tooth Banding…a Two for One

Wooden Patterns for ParquetryArticle & Video

Wood Inlay Banding – How to Make Barber Pole BandingVideo

Wood Inlay Banding – How to Make the Square Pattern…Video

Wood Inlay…the Bandings are readyVideo

Wood Inlay…Making a Statement

Wood Patterns for Inlay BandingsArticle & Video

 Woodturning…Salt and Pepper mills - Wood Turning - Woodturning Projects - Wood Lathe - Woodturner

 Creating and Turning Salt and Peppermills

A fascinating woodturning process

Let’s Turn Salt and Pepper MillsVideo

 Wood turning tools used for the Salt and Pepper Mills

 

 …Segmented Wood Turning…Segmented Woodturning - Segmented Bowl Turning - Segmented woodturners - Segmented woodturning videos

 A Salad Bowl set of maple & walnut…part 1

A Salad Bowl set of maple & walnut…part 2

Finishing the Segmented Vase of walnut & mapleVideo

Gluing and Aligning wood rings for Segmented Turnings

Mortising the base of the segmented vaseVideo

9 1/2″ x 12″ Vase…Segmented Woodturning

Organizing the segments and rings

Segmented Vase 9″ x 12″…Mahogany, maple, cherry, & walnut

 Segmented Vase…maple & walnut

Segmented vase of maple, mahogany, and walnut

Segmented Wood Turning…a Cherry and Walnut Bowl

Staved Segmented Woodturning…a Fruit Bowl

The Process of Segmented Woodturning

Turning a Segmented Vase on a Wood Lathe

Woodturning…A Segmented Vase of Walnut and Maple

Woodturning…Dinner Salad Bowls of Mahogany and Walnut

Woodturning… video of the 9″ x 12″ Segmented VaseVideo

Wood Turn a Segmented Knob on a Wood Lathe…Video

Wood Turning…a Segmented Fruit Bowl…part 1Video

 Wood Turning…a Segmented Fruit Bowl…part 2Video

……

Woodworking Power Tools


Decorative Inlay Patterns for Custom Hardwood Inlays

“Every beauty which is seen here by persons of perception resembles more than anything else that celestial source from which we all  come.”
Michelangelo…Italian Sculptor, painter, architect, engineer, and poet (1475-1564)

Inlay Design from the Duomo in Florence Italy

Inlay Pattern from Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Italy

If you have been following this woodworking blog for anytime you know that there is quite a bit of attention devoted to creating wood inlay in the workshop. As woodworkers who love our work, we are constantly on the lookout for new ideas and fresh inspirations. Sometimes, we are able to capture insights from woodworking magazines, DVDs, or books on working with wood. However, on a recent trip I came across something very stimulating that I’d like to share with you, my viewers. These decorative inlay patterns for custom hardwood inlays are actually inlay designs from the facade of the Santa Maria del Foire Cathedral in Florence, Italy.

When you first see the this church it can be quite overwhelming as it truly magnificent and is just loaded with such a vast amount of finely crafted detail. What is even more amazing is the fact that entire facade of this Cathedral is wrapped in polychromatic veneers of marble. For the purpose of this posting on decorative inlay patterns for custom hardwood inlays, I find it best to begin with an extremely simple and yet elegant marble inlay design. The white marble is from Carrara. The green is from Prato and the red marble is from Sienna. (Carrara, Prato, and Sienna are all towns in Italy from which the marble is quarried.) Notice how the marble color combinations play off of one another. Also, take a look at how the interior mouldings of the rectangle and the square are mitered. As a woodworker, if you want to learn how to inlay wood, this design in marble is a great place to start.

Starting from the small square at the very center of the inlay pattern, notice how this white square is turned on its point and sets the stage for the direction of the overall inlay design. The rounded red cross follows this same direction as does the larger square. Here, the larger square with its mouldings and shadow lines adds a perception of depth as does the surrounding rectangle with its mouldings.

The overall inlay pattern may seem difficult at first. However, this is where we woodworkers take our time and enjoy the woodworking process. As you can clearly see, the inlay design is not hard once we break it down into its smaller components. However, my first thought is that it would be best to lay this custom inlay pattern out on paper and then take our measurements from there. By making duplicate copies of the overall pattern we can make templates available for each component’s pattern. From there it is just a matter of fitting the components together.

Marble inlays from the Duomo, Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Italy

When creating wood inlay patterns we are able to utilize our veneers from an assortment of hardwoods. Here, we can experiment with different wood colors to see how they contrast or compliment one another. We can also pay special attention to the wood grain patterns as this may provide a positive influence to our custom woodworking inlay.

Keep in mind that once we have the overall decorative inlay patterns and individual component templates made, we can then create any number of custom hardwood inlays. From here it is simply a matter of production work and if we choose, we can repeat the inlay pattern throughout our wood project. As you can imagine, the craftsman of the Santa Maria del Fiore Cathedral used this custom inlay and other inlay designs continually on the marble facade to create an astonishing work of art. What type of an affect could inlays like this have on our furniture pieces, fireplace mantels, and other wood projects?

Note: The installation on the front facade of the Santa Maria del Fiore began in 1876 and was completed in 1887.

Recommended Videos:
How to install Wood Inlay
Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band Saw
Let’s Install Wood Inlay Bandings



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Double Bevel Marquetry…a Tulip of Various Woods

One of the beautiful aspects of woodworking is that there are so many facets to the craft. Marquetry is one of these woodworking crafts that requires just  basic woodworking tools and is well with the reach for all of us. For this woodworking project we will learn how to make a tulip using double bevel marquetry techniques. The primary shop tools used for this wood project are the scroll saw, table saw, and the band saw. The hardwoods selected for this project came from a number of wood species that were in the scrap bin. Selected woods for this woodworking project  include hickory, maple, padauk, and poplar.

Our woodworking plan starts with choosing a design for the marquetry. In this instance the tulip design for this woodworking project was derived from a picture of a tulip that was located on the internet and then printed. The wood veneers used in the marquetry are 3/32″ thick and they were sliced on the band saw. A veneer of hickory was chosen as the background due to its warm colors and also because of  its interesting grain pattern. The hickory veneer was then lightly sprayed with an adhesive and the printed tulip picture was then pressed onto it. The picture of the tulip  becomes an outline for making the appropriate cuts on the scroll saw with its table set to six degrees.  One might wonder “why is the scroll saw table is set at an angle of six degrees?”  The reason is because we will be cutting through a taped packet consisting of two layers of veneer at one time and the angle will compensate for the saw kerf of the scroll saw blade. Note: 1.) Select a thin, fine scroll saw blade. 2.) Select a drill bit that is equal to the scroll saw blade.  3.) Use masking or blue tape to secure the packet of veneer layers to be cut. 4.) Drill an entry hole at a 6 degree angle to feed the scroll saw blade through the veneer packet.

So, what happens to the two layers of veneer being cut? Good question! One layer (hickory…the background veneer) becomes waste and the new veneer layer is then nestled into the angled cut of the hickory background piece. Remember, both veneers are being cut at the six degree angle at the same time so the infill piece will fit right into the area just removed. Once we have a good fit it is then time to apply a small amount of glue to the mating parts. We’ll use yellow glue and then apply dampened veneer tape on the back side opposite the picture to secure the placement of the new inlay. Give it a little time to set up and then we are ready to cut another section following the glued  picture of the tulip as our guide. Be selective of the choice of woods in order to “paint your picture.” The wood colors and grains will all contribute to the finished product.

As we go about the process of cutting, fitting, and gluing parts in place at the workbench you may wonder how it will look when completed because at this stage it can appear “rough.” There’s still paper on the surface and glue as well.  Don’t worry and just keep pushing through because it will all clean up. Once all the parts are in place and the glue has set it’s time add a backer veneer to stabilize the woods of the face veneer. Simply select a veneer similar in wood density to the face veneer and cut to size. Then just glue the two veneers together. When the glue sets you’ll want to clean the clean the edges and make rectangular in preparation for the picture frame.

Next it’s time to prepare for the finish. Use a freshly sharpened card scraper to smooth the surface as it will give you a nicely planed surface. Sure, sandpaper can be used, however use caution as some exotic woods can bleed into other woods when sanding.

When the marquetry and the scraping is completed it’s time to frame the project just as you would a picture frame. It’s is a good idea to employ a sanding sealer to seal the surface of the veneers. Again use caution while wiping on the sealer to avoid any bleeding if using exotic woods. Then it’s a matter of choosing the wood finish.

Keep in mind that marquetry can be used in a variety of ways. For instance, a woodworker may employ marquetry in furniture pieces like as a desk or table top. Perhaps you’ve even seen marquetry applied to the face of cabinet doors. Let your imagination guide you along the way for your own woodworking projects and you’ll discover that it’s a great way to enjoy your time in the woodworking shop.

So, if you would like to get started in double bevel marquetry simply cut a few veneers and just practice on them for a while. Get the feel of cutting on an angle at the scroll saw. Remember, it’s normal to break a few blades and have some mistakes in the beginning. Accept that and move forward. Before long you’ll get the hang of it and you’ll be creating with confidence. Enjoy the process of double bevel marquetry!


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

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