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July 27, 2017

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Wolf’s Tooth Wood Inlay Banding…a Two for One

“It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.”
…..Muhammad Ali, Heavyweight boxing champ…1942 –

Wolf's Tooth Banding... a closer look

Detailed view of Wolf's Tooth banding

One of the benefits of creating “Wolf’s Tooth” wood inlay bandings is that you actually get two bandings for the effort of one. What do I mean by this? When the initial cuts from the laminated stock are made on the table saw using the dedicated miter saw we flip the stock after each segment is cut. By doing this we are getting the necessary angles for the segments however, we wind up with segments that have two different color combinations. After all of the segments are cut we then need to carefully separate the segments by color. This way we will have two distinctive color patterns for our hardwood inlays. (The separating of the two color type can be tedious however, it is very important in order to maintain uniformity of the custom inlay bandings.)

Wolf's Tooth Wood Inlay banding segments

Wolf's Tooth Wood Inlay banding segments

In the photo to the right notice how the wooden inlay segments are cut from the same laminated stock. The stock is repeatedly flipped along the miter sled fence with each cut producing segments of two color types.
(The segment shown on the left goes with the inlay pattern on the left side picture frame while the segment on the right corresponds to the inlay design of the picture frame on the right.)

Notice the importance of of the wood color. (Place dark woods next to light color woods to get the best contrast.)
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Also read…Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Learn more about wood inlay by studying “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 1” and “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2.”
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Watch the following wood inlay videos:

Creating bandings for wood inlay

Wood Inlay…the Bandings are ready

How to install Wood Inlay



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.
…..Aristotle, Greek Philosopher (384 BC – 322 BC)

Inlay Wood...Wolf's Tooth...Custom Inlay Banding

Wooden Inlay...Wolf's Tooth...Custom Inlay Banding

The “Wolf’s Tooth” decorative wood inlay banding pattern is a wonderful custom inlay used to embellish furniture, picture frames, wooden boxes, and a host of other woodworking projects. The wooden segments (teeth) were cut on the table saw equipped with a Forrest Woodworker II 40 tooth saw blade. Also, the dedicated miter sled was used in order to maintain precision and to create uniform triangular segments which make up the “teeth” of this hardwood inlay banding. White glue is used instead of yellow glue to allow a greater working time when assembling the segments into position within the banding “sandwich.” Veneer inlays called “bandings” will be sliced on the band saw at about 3/32″. The bandings will eventually be fit and let into a plough or dado of the wood project to be decorated.

Wolf's Tooth...Wood Inlay Bandings

A mahogany picture frame with decorative wood inlay banding of cherry, walnut, and maple.

The African mahogany picture frame reveals how a custom wood inlay banding like the “wolf’s tooth’ pattern can enhance a woodworking project. This hardwood inlay banding consist of maple, cherry, and walnut. Notice how the colors of the various hardwoods contrast one another within the repetitive pattern of the “teeth” and also how the borders play off of the mahogany picture frame. The wood inlay banding naturally draws attention to the picture frame and further draws awareness to celebrate the photograph.

A banding with the same “wolf’s tooth” pattern is shown below the picture frame. This particular veneer inlay includes maple, cherry, and walnut within the “teeth” pattern however, the outer border consist of walnut and holly. The pure white holly will create an even greater contrast than a maple border when inlaid into a wood with a dark tone.

(By the way…The photograph is of my Great, Grandfather along with his two prized working mules. The photo was taken on his farm outside of Salem, Missouri where he and his family were a few of the early settlers in this area during the 1850’s.)

Learn more about wood inlay by studying “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 1” and “How to make Bandings for Wood Inlay…Part 2.”

Watch the following wood inlay videos:

Creating bandings for wood inlay

Wood Inlay…the Bandings are ready

How to install Wood Inlay


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

The Art of Wood Inlay Banding

The Art of Wood Inlay Banding

 

Cosmati Design - The Art of Wood Inlay BandingThe art of wood inlay banding is a lost art. While many people are thrilled to see furniture, jewelry boxes, and pictures frames adorned with wood inlay banding, the truth is, very few woodworkers know how to make their own decorative wood inlay banding. Yes, of course a woodworker can inlay a simple strip of contrasting wood to accent a wood project. However, the focus of this woodworking article is the art of wood inlay banding. So, let’s look at some examples of wood inlay banding made in the woodworking shop by fellow woodworkers.

 

Vincenzo shares The Art of Wood Inlay Banding 

 

 A Walnut Table  with Barber Pole Inlay Banding 

Walnut Table and drawer with banding inlays - The Art of Wood Inlay BandingsVincenzo is a very talented woodworker living in the beautiful Mediterranean town of Mazara del Vallo which is on the west coast of the island of Sicily. This artisan has shared with us a walnut table with drawer that features a beautiful inlay design known as barber pole wood inlay banding.  This terrific inlay banding consists of maple and rosewood segments. Check out the article A Sicilian Walnut Table with Decorative Wood Inlay Banding to learn more about the art of wood inlay banding.

 

A Veneered Coffee Table with Wood Inlay by Vincenzo

Wood veneer coffee table by VincenzoVincenzo also shares with us a terrific wood veneer coffee table that he has made in his workshop. You will notice the detailed matching of the veneer on this lovely table. Also, notice how your eyes are drawn to the design at the center of the table. There is an effective wood inlay banding of olive and walnut that frames the featured center design. The other woods that make up the coffee table are ash and chestnut.

 

 

Steve shares The Art of Wood Inlay Banding

 

A Decorative Display Case

Cabinet of Ships Brass barometer & clock - The Art of Wood InlaySteve from Cairns, Australia sent in a few photos of his woodworking projects featuring wood inlay banding. Like Vincenzo, Steve discovered the art of wood inlay banding. He has honed his skills of making wood inlay bandings in his woodworking shop to adorn some great woodworking projects. In the photo we can see that Wolf’s tooth inlay banding is featured near the crown and base of  this display case  of Queensland maple. Steve made this keepsake project for one of his customers and it houses a ship’s barometer and clock, both of brass. This outstanding cabinet is finished with a blend of tung oil and polyurethane.

 

Medicine Cabinet with Wolf’s Tooth Inlay Banding

Medicine Cabinet - The Art of Wood InlaySteve also submitted another great woodworking project. This is a medicine cabinet made of Queensland red cedar and Queensland maple. Notice the stylish Wolf’s Tooth wood inlay banding near the crown of the cabinet that Steve designed. The banding consist of  silver ash and New Guinea rosewood. This is another great example of a woodworker who has learned the art of wood inlay banding.

 Be sure to see Steve’s Shop Tour.

Many thanks for these great woodworkers for sharing their skills with us.

 

Watch more YouTube woodworking how to videos online.

…Your comments are welcomed…

 

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University


Learn how to make Wood Inlay Bandings

Learn how to make Wood Inlay Bandings

 

Wood Inlay Bandings

Learn how to make wood inlay bandingsLearn how to make wood inlay bandings so that you can decorate your woodworking projects. There is something distinctively special about creating something in your woodworking shop with your own hands. For a lot of us, this is one of the main reasons we chose the craft of woodworking. It just feels good to use our learned skills to make something out of wood that is worthwhile. It even feels better when we can create our wood project and  then embellish it with our own shop-made decorative wood inlay bandings. So, let’s go into the details and learn how to make wood inlay bandings.

 “I can accept failure. Everyone fails at something. But, I can’t accept not trying.” …Michael Jordan

Maple, Walnut, Maple Lamination on the Tilted Bandsaw Miter SledWhen we learn how to make wood inlay bandings we find that it can be very beneficial to make wide banding logs. It really takes no more time and effort to make a wider log than a narrower banding log. As a result of creating the wider log, we will have plenty more decorative wood inlay bandings. For example, the inlay banding log shown in this posting will make about 32 lineal feet of decorative wood inlay bandings. This will work very well for a single large woodworking project or it could simply set the theme for related wood projects.

 

Walnut, Maple, Walnut Lamination at the Tilted Band Saw Miter SledTo make our wood inlay bandings on the band saw we need to start out with two lamination patterns. Notice how each lamination mirrors the other lamination. One is walnut, maple, and walnut while the sister lamination is maple, walnut, and maple. Keep in mind, it is critical that the dimensions of one pattern match the other pattern. (We use a dial caliper to ensure accuracy of the measurements.) Essentially, we are using the exact same techniques that we have used when we created “Wolf’s Tooth” wood inlay bandings.

The band saw serves as a safe, efficient, and accurate power tool for slicing our wood segments needed to create the wood inlay bandings. The table of the band saw is  set at 45 degrees  as the shopmade tilted band saw miter sled along with a stop-block is used for a controlled cut of the laminated wood segments.

Note: A general purpose 3/8″ x 4TPI bandsaw blade is being used for cutting banding segments.

Uniformly cut laminated wood segmentsNotice how the two lamination patterns match up and provide a contrast with one another in this photo. With this contrast we are creating a geometric pattern that catches the eye. As one can see, there is an alternating pattern of light and dark wood tones.

 

 

 

Seperate & organize the two lamination patterns.When all the wood segments are cut it is important to separate and organize them. This is critical as we want to make sure we have a uniform pattern free of any stray segments. Also, by laying out the wood segments ahead we have a good idea how long the outer laminations will need to be. (The tape measure in the photo reveals that the banding log will be 30″ long.)

 

 

 

Use a Combination Square to square up the first segment

Blue painter’s tape is used to help align the wood segments during the glue-up. It’s important to square up the first segment with a combination square and you’ll notice that the edges of the segments are also referenced off of the edge of the work table. We want to make sure that we have a good layout of the bottom row of segments before we start applying any glue. When we are satisfied with the layout of the bottom row we can then begin to apply our glue up while laying in the top row of segments.

Note: The bottom segments shown in this photo are the walnut, maple, walnut pattern. The top layer segment pattern is maple, walnut maple.

My preference of glue for for my wood inlay bandings is white glue. I like the fact that white glue gives me more time working time before it sets up. For me this is especially important as my workshop is in the desert where we typically have a low humidity and also can have very high temperatures. I also prefer the thinner viscosity of  white glue to that of yellow glue when working with inlay bandings. For long and wide surfaces, apply the glue from the glue bottle and then use a scrap block as a trowel to distribute the glue. However, acid brushes work very well to spread an even coat of glue onto the individual banding segments.

Gluing & applying the Outer Veneers A contrasting wood is chosen for the outer veneers.  Apply an even coating of glue to both the outer veneer and the surface of the glued up segment package.

 

 

 

 

Blue painter's tape wrapped around the banding package.Note: During this glue-up the outer veneer will have a tendency to slide out of alignment with the segment package. Make sure that both components remain in alignment to one another by wrapping blue painters tape around the total glued-up as shown in the photo.

 

 

 

The Wood Inlay Banding package clamped during glue-upApply a caul to the top of the banding package and evenly distribute firm pressure with the clamps. Then, allow adequate time for the glue to cure.

When the glue of the wood inlay banding log is cured it is then time to remove the clamps and clean up the banding log of any excess glue. Hand scrapers come in very handy for this operation. After the dried glue is completely removed, then joint one edge. Then place the jointed edge against the fence of the table saw or band saw so that the opposite edge of banding log can be ripped and made parallel.


Learn more about making wood inlay bandings.

Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band SawVideo

Let’s Install Wood Inlay BandingsVideo

Making Wood Inlay on the BandsawVideo

Wolf’s Tooth…a Decorative Wood Inlay Banding

Wolf’s Tooth Banding…a Two for One

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

How to Make a Bandsaw Miter Sled

The Bandsaw Miter Sled

 

“I will see it when I believe it.”
Dr. Wayne Dyer…Motivational author and speaker (1940 – )

 

Bandsaw Miter Sled – a Wood Shop Accessory

Miter Cut on Bandsaw Miter Sled

Miter Cut on Bandsaw Miter Sled

There are many times while in the shop working on wood projects that we find a need of various woodworking jigs and then at times we also will have a need for an assortment of saw accessories. Sometimes we need to make a shop accessory while in the middle of our wood project and then again there are instances when our project is actually the building of a shop accessory. In either case here is a crosscut sled that you may find very handy at some point. Let me introduce you to the dedicated bandsaw miter sled. You’ll be glad to learn how to make a miter sled for your bandsaw.

 

Cutting a Miter with the Bandsaw Miter Sled

Cutting a Miter with the Bandsaw Miter Sled

One of my favorite cross cutting sleds made in the workshop is the dedicated bandsaw miter sled and the reason I like it so much is because it is great for working with smaller material. Now, often times I will use the dedicated miter sled for the table saw for the miter cutting of larger wood pieces. However, when there is a need to cut a miter on smaller material I choose the dedicated bandsaw miter sled for making the cuts because it too is very safe, accurate, and efficient.

 

The Beauty of the Bandsaw Miter Slde

 

Bandsaw miter sled front view

Bandsaw miter sled front view.

The beauty of the dedicated bandsaw miter sled is its simplicity. It is easy to make from wood scraps in just 10 minutes and you will be is ready to cut dead-on miter joints immediately thereafter. One of my favorite uses for this saw sled is miter cutting when fitting and installing bandings of wood inlay. It works especially well when cutting segments for an wood inlay pattern called “Wolf’s Tooth“.

 

 

 

Enjoy these Band Saw Accessories and Techniques: :

Tilting Bandsaw Miter Sled

Bandsaw Crosscut Sled

Bandsaw Rip Fence made in the Shop

Cutting Thin Strips on the Band Saw



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

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