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September 26, 2017

Archives for January 2011

35…Woodworking Tip – The Power of the Shim

Woodworking Tip – a Simple Shim

 

“Never underestimate the power of a single thought.”
Ender…Friend and Salesman…(1964-)

Woodworking Tip from a Friend

 

A Crosscut Sled, Table Saw and a Paper shim

A Crosscut Sled, Table Saw and a Paper shim

Have you ever tried to remove a small amount of material for a perfect fit? Sometimes it can be a challenge. Here’s a woodworking tip that just might work for you.

There are times that a little woodworking tip can make all the difference in the world for a woodworker. A small idea can be profound in its simplicity and that is the case with this woodworking tip. It was passed on to me during my apprenticeship by a journeyman whom I had the pleasure of working with for a many years. He has been gone a long time now. However, I am grateful to him for sharing this useful woodworking tip and technique. It is often employed while working in the wood shop. See if you agree.

We as woodworking craftsman continually strive to improve of skills. A woodworking tip can come in handy. In this video a lid for a jewelry box is being fit without a tape measure or carpenter’s ruler. See how to make the cut with the aid of a paper shim along with a crosscut sled on the table saw. Watch and you can see how to make the cut done by “sneaking up” on the crosscut to achieve a perfect fit.

 

Note: Tearout of the lid is eliminated by using the zero clearance crosscut sled.

 

The woodworking tip for the video segment is taken from a 6-part video series…Let’s Build a Jewelry Box.

 

Recommended Video… How to make poorboy Parallel Clamps
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The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

 

34…How to adjust for Band Saw Blade Drift

Adjusting for Band Saw Blade Drift

 

“A warrior never worries about his fear.”
Carlos Castaneda…Peuvian-born American anthropologist and author (1925-1998)

Understanding Band Saw Blade Drift

When resawing wood veneers on the band saw it is quite important to take into account the the band saw blade drift. If the adjustment is correctly made for the drift angle a woodworker can rip straight thin strips of veneer that are of a uniform thickness. By making an accurate adjustment to the bandsaw fence one can save plenty of time and material. Better yet, a woodworker can perform with a greater level of confidence. So, learn how to adjust for band saw blade drift.

 

What causes band saw blade drift?

A band saw blade has two sets of teeth. Band saw blade drift occurs because the differences in set and sharpness of the bandsaw teeth from one side of the blade to the other side of the blade.

One theory has it that heat caused by friction can also play a role in band saw blade drift. It is said that the cutting action of the saw teeth creates more heat in the front of the blade than the back of the blade. The front expands more than the back and becomes slightly longer. As a result the blade can warp inward or outward and thus cause the cut to drift.

 

Bevel square used to adjust band saw blade drift

Recently, a number of the viewers of this blog have asked me some great questions concerning the cutting of uniform thin strips of wood veneer on the bandsaw. They wanted to know how to adjust for band saw blade drift. While I have responded to their questions already, I believe this woodworking video will help to further clarify and resolve their concerns. Perhaps, it can make a difference for you also. As you will see, this article will point out an important step of the process regarding making an adjustment for the band saw blade drift. Ripping uniform thin strips of veneer is an easy task once the angle of the drift is understood and accounted for by making a simple adjustment to the fence.

 

Making the adjustment for Band Saw Blade Drfit

 

Band saw auxiliary fence - Band saw blade drift adjustment

(This tutorial on how to adjust for band saw blade drift assumes that the band saw is correctly set-up with a proper tension, the bandsaw blade guides are accurately adjusted, and a good sharp blade is in place.)

 

This woodworking video tutorial shows how the angle of the drift is found. A bevel square is used to duplicate the angle once it is determined. The video also shows how the thin rip fence is set in place by using a wedge at one end of the fence. Spring clamps help to secure the wedged fence angle. (Some band saw fences can be adjusted by loosening the bolts, aligning the fence according to the drift angle, and then re-tightening the bolts.)



A Rockler thin rip jig with a roller bearing is set into the miter gauge slot and is fastened in place by simply turning a star knob. Placement of the bearing is 1/2″ before the band saw blade. The thickness of cut is set to 3/32″ as this is the thickness used in my wood shop when ripping wood inlay bandings. The demonstration clearly shows how to cut stock that is 3/4″ high and stock that is 3″ tall. All veneers that are ripped were within 1/64″ of one another. (In the video the second to last veneer was actually the leftover piece and was not ripped. It was just a bit thicker than the other strips of ripped veneer. However, it was close enough to be included in this batch as it can be run through the open drum sander to attain the desired measurement of 3/32″.)

 

Maple Veneer Thin Strips - Band saw blade drift adjustedConsider the need for adjusting the fence for band saw blade drift as basic maintenance of the band saw. Through repeated usage the blade cuts can again drift as the set of the teeth undergo change. This is normal. However, understanding how to adjust the fence for band saw blade drift is an easy matter. It just takes a few minutes. Acting on this matter will allow you to rip material that is straight. When a thin rip jig is added to the equation you will be able to also make cuts that are of uniform thickness.

 

Note: The blade used for this particular demonstration is a PS Wood Timberwolf bandsaw blade (3/8″ blade with 4 teeth per inch.) However, select a blade according to your needs.

 

Helpful Tips:

1.) Check that the band saw table is set 90 degrees to the blade. Use a combination square or a digital protractor to ensure this angle.

2.) The auxiliary rip fence was simply made with scrap 5/8″ particle board. It is made to the same length and height as the original fence. It’s just a matter of making the cuts, adding a little glue, and using an air-nailer to drive the pins home.

 

Recommended Article: How to Cut Uniform Thin Strips

Recommended Videos:

Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band Saw

Cutting Thin Strips on the Band Saw

Band Saw Rip Fence made in the Shop

The Apprentice and The Journeyman University


Woodworking Skills…The Shape of Things to Come

Woodworking Skills

Woodworking skills - The beginning stages of the walnut maple vase.

The beginning stages of the walnut maple vase.

Ah! The importance of woodworking skills. Take a moment to think back to when you originally became interested in working with wood. What was it that sparked your interest in the wood craft? How did you feel when you picked up a woodworking tool for the first time? For what reason did you become a woodworker or carpenter? Was it to make furniture with tight fitting joinery? Could it be that you were drawn to hand tools or power tools? Let’s take a look to see where our woodworking skills are today.

“You become what you think about”
Earl Nightingale…American motivational speaker and author (1921-1989)

For some of us woodworking or carpentry may be or has been our livelihood and it continues to be our hobby in the workshop as well. Some of us have other jobs outside of woodworking and yet working with wood and a furniture plan is one way in which we enjoy spending our time. There’s just something good about having a wood shop where we can take our time and focus on our craft to build the things that we want. It’s just nice to be able to have an idea in our heads, to be able to work with our hands, and see a wood project being created. We are as much a part of it as it is a part of us. Perhaps as much as we make a project out of wood, it in return is making us in some way. The better our woodworking skills, the better our woodworking projects become.

Woodworking skills - Segmented Vase of Maple and Walnut

Segmented Vase of Maple and Walnut

This article is as much for the beginning woodworker as it is for the experienced woodworker. We all started this journey on day one with few if any tools or woodworking skills. Perhaps, there are of us that received some sort of training or maybe we just learned on our own. In either case, our woodworking skills define where we are in the wood craft today and what we are able to accomplish at any given time. As a result of improving our  skills, we are able to advance our woodworking tasks. Woodworking skills allow us to be able to create more and for a woodworker this is a sense of freedom. Simply put, woodworking skills is where it’s at. For a new woodworker this may mean learning how to sharpen a chisel, whereas for an experienced woodworker it may mean having all of our plane irons honed and hand planes ready for use when needed.

Woodworking skills - Wood Finish applied to a wanut and maple segmented vase.

Wood Finish applied to a wanut and maple segmented vase.

Together, we have many different levels of woodworking skills. However, something many of us do have in common is the desire to constantly improve what skills we do have. Perhaps there is something inside of us that continually reminds us how and why we first got involved in the woodcraft. Maybe it is the sense of pride that comes when we know that we are doing the best we can with the skills we currently have. It’s also knowing and trusting that we can and are improving towards our potential with each and every new woodworking challenge.

 

 

1.) Name one woodworking skill that you would like to improve upon.
2.) Why?
3.) What would it do for you?


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

How to Cut Uniform Thin Strips

“The man who has no imagination has no wings.”
Muhammed Ali…3-time World Heavyweight Boxing Champion (1942-)

Hardwood Veneer cut on Band Saw

Hardwood Veneer cut on Band Saw

One of my woodworking shop accessories is drawing a lot of attention lately. Many viewers have seen it on my band saw during recent woodworking videos and they have asked me about it in their emails. While the name of the tool implies that it is to be used on the table saw, it has also found a lot of time on the bandsaw cutting thin strips of wood inlay bandings. What is it you ask? It is an invaluable saw accessory called the Rockler Thin Rip Tablesaw Jig.

One might ask “What makes this simple jig so special?” The beauty of this jig is indeed its simplicity. There is a roller bearing on the end of the accessory. The jig is adjustable from side to side and it can be locked into position in the miter gauge slot. When used on the tablesaw the roller bearing is set away from the blade an amount equal to the thickness of the desired ripping. Then the jig is simply slid about 4-5 inches in front of the saw blade and locked into position. Basically, that’s it.

How to Cut Uniform Thin Strips on the Tablesaw
1.) Place the surfaced edge of the board to be cut alongside the roller bearing.
2.) Slide the table saw fence alongside the opposite edge of the board.
3.) Lock the fence in place. When ready turn on the saw and take a small practice cut into the board.
4.) Check the measurement with a dial or digital caliper. Make lateral adjustments of the bearing as needed to obtain the desired measurement and adjust the fence to the boards’ opposite edge. When you have the right measurement for the ripping it is time to “rip away.”
5.) Simply, repeat the procedure of moving the table saw fence in alongside the edge opposite of the cut after every rip is made.

Band saw setup for ripping wood inlay bandings

Bandsaw setup for ripping wood inlay bandings

How to Cut Uniform Thin Strips on the Bandsaw
Note: (The “drift” of the band saw blade must first be accounted for when using this technique.) In the picture to the left a small wedge has been set between the manufacturers’ fence and the L-shaped thin rip fence. This was performed to set the fence to the correct angle of the “drift.”)

1.) Set the roller bearing a distance away from the blade that is equal to the desired ripping.
2.) Now, place the roller bearing an inch or so in front of the bandsaw blade and turn the star knob down to lock the jig in place.
3.) Next, place the right edge of the surfaced board alongside of the bearing.
4.) We now want to set an L-shaped thin rip fence alongside the left edge of the board to be ripped.
5.) Place the regular bandsaw fence next to the L-shaped thin rip fence and clamp both fences together along the boards’ left edge. Lock the fence and for safety lower the bandsaw’s bearing guides to just above the boards’ surface.

Dial caliper measure thickness of wood inlay banding

Dial caliper measure thickness of wood inlay banding

At this point it is just a matter of taking a practice cut to check the accuracy of the thickness of the ripping with a digital or dial caliper. Adjust as necessary. When the correct measurement is obtained it is time to rip. To make the next rip it is simply a matter of placing the board’s right edge against the roller bearing and then sliding the fences over to the left edge of the board. Rip and repeat the process to obtain uniform rippings.

The Rockler Thin Rip Tablesaw Jig has been in my woodworking shop for over 3 years and is still going strong. It is great for making rips on the tablesaw. However, it is also terrific on the bandsaw as it allows me to rip wood inlay bandings to a consistent uniform thickness of 3/32.” This simple little jig allows me to perform operations safely, efficiently, and with accuracy.

So, give it a try. You’ll be glad you did.

Recommended Videos…

Ripping Thin Strips on Wood Inlay on the Band Saw

Cutting Thin Strips on the Band Saw

Band Saw Rip Fence made in the Shop


The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

Buffard Freres wood inlay bandings…1134-1141

“I went to a restaurant that serves “breakfast at any time”. So I ordered French Toast during the Renaissance.”
Steven Wright…American comedian,actor, and writer. (1955-)

Buffard Frere decorative wood inlay bandings 1134-1137

Buffard Frere decorative wood inlay bandings 1134-1137

We continue with our study of the decorative wood inlay bandings of the Buffard Freres of Paris. These wood inlay banding designs are from the company’s 1926 catalog.

We first take a look at bandings 1134-1137

This group of bandings have similarities in their design and construction. Each banding design has three components.

Buffard Frere decoraitve wood inlay bandings 1140-1141

Buffard Frere wood inlay bandings 1140-1141

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The components:

1.) Outer Veneers…These components are the top and bottom members of the banding package. When the completed banding is inlaid in place the Outer Veneers are the defining lines on the outside edges of the banding. An Outer Veneer may be a single line of veneer or even multiple lines of veneer. The Outer Veneers whose grain runs along the length of the Package serves to hold the horizontal and vertical components together once glued.

2.) Horizontal Components…The Horizontal Components’ grain runs along the length of the Package. The component members are uniformly cross cut from a longer strip of wood. It’s thickness is equal to the height of the Vertical Component and it is also wider than the Vertical Component in this illustration.

3.) The Vertical Components…The Vertical Components each have three members that are glued to one another. Each Vertical Component is uniformly cross cut from a longer section that has two outside members and one interior member. The outside members have contrasting wood tones from that of the inside members. The grain direction of the Vertical Component is 90 degrees to the Horizontal Components’ grain direction. The height of this component is equal to the thickness of the Horizontal Component.

While bandings 1134-1137 are similar in design and in construction, we can easily see that the color combinations vary from one to the other along with the sizes of the components. This is the beauty of wood inlay bandings in that we can take one style of banding and make minor tweaks to arrive at a custom inlay banding that offers a unique appearance.
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Recommended Video…Bandsaw Crosscut Sled
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Recommended Video…Let’s Install Wood Inlay Bandings
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Buffard Freres decorative wood inlay bandings 1138-1139

Buffard Freres decorative wood inlay bandings 1138-1139

Banding 1138…My belief is that that banding has two basic components.

1.) Outer Veneers…The Outer Veneers are the top and bottom members and has its wood grain running along the length of the banding Package.

2.) Vertical Components…These components are made from a length of two laminated strips of contrasting woods. Each individual strip is of a differing thickness. The Vertical Components are uniformly cross cut and placed vertically on the bottom Outer Veneer during gluing.

Banding 1139…It looks like this banding is made of three components. (Outer Veneers and two types of Vertical Components.)

1.) Outer Veneers…The Outer Veneers include the top and bottom members who grain runs along the length of the banding Package.

2.) Vertical Components…

a.) A dark square member with a yellow strip on each side. These laminated members were uniformly cross cut from a longer length.

b.) Alternating colors of black, red, black. These member were also uniformly cross cut from a length of laminating members.

Recommended Video… Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band Saw



The Apprentice and The Journeyman University

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